Role Models PDF Print E-mail

Our Scout Programs assist our Scouts in developing a compass for how to live their life and lead their life. We are determined to play a part in the whole life of our Scouts.

 

The Scout Programs of Adventure Scouts USA believe in the power of good role models. We want our Scouts to be surrounded by those of good character -- people who are going to support our Scouts and demonstrate how to live a life of purpose.

 

Role Models Already in Our Scouts Lives

 

We understand our Scouts already have people who demonstrate good character in their lives. That is why we make a special effort to involve friends, family members, neighbors, teachers, coaches, and religious leaders by inviting them to offer their insight. Multiple generations and extended family members have a standing, open invitation to join us in our programs and activities. The Scout Programs of Adventure Scouts USA consider Parents our Partners. We are indeed Partners with Parents, united in our goal of improving the lives of youth. By including people who play a role in the lives of our Scouts, we positively impact the day-to-day choices our Scouts make.

 

Role Models in Our Scout Programs

 

Our volunteers and Counselors help our Scouts develop good character by demonstrating it in their own lives. Our Team Counselors serve as mentors and role models for our Scouts. Every child needs someone who supports their efforts and challenges them to realize their full potential. We also provide opportunities for our Scouts to interact with others of good character, such as police and fire personnel.firefighter

 

We positively impact the day-to-day choices our Scouts make by helping our Scouts interact with good role models. The positive interaction with someone even for a moment can leave a life long impression and inspire our Scouts.

 

Adult Positive Role Models

 

We think is important for youth to interact with positive role model who are adults.man and girl with telescopeThere is plenty of opportunity for interaction between Scouts and their parents. But we also make sure Scouts have time to interact with other adults who are positive role models. As parents know, sometimes their children say “No!” to their request before the parent even opens their mouth! Youth are often more open to what to another adult says. We encourage the participation of grandparents, aunts and uncles, as well adults the Scout is not related to. The two most important adult/child relationships in our Scouts’ lives are with their parents and their educator. Those are hierarchical relationships however and our Scouts also benefit from interaction with adults with whom the relationship is less hierarchical. Sometimes youth have a relationship with close friends of their parents, sometimes even calling them “aunt” or “uncle.” We encourage that kind of relationship between Scouts and adult positive role models. Our Scouts acquire knowledge of everything from camping to community service from adults with whom they have a positive relationship, whom they listen to work with eagerly.

 
Adventure Scouts USA